Playing with Mountaineer Ethernet Mainboard

Posted by Marco Minerva In these days I’m making some tests with Ethernet Mainboard, a Gadgeteer compatibile mainboard that is produced by the Mountaineer Group. Here it is the main characteristics of the mainboard, as described at http://www.mountaineer-boards.com/home/ethernet-mainboard: “Red mainboard” powered via USB 168 MHz STM32F407 microcontroller with 192 KB RAM and 1 MB on-chip Flash 8 […]

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Gadgeteer Home Automation System

Posted by Marco Minerva In this post I want to describe how to create a Home Automation System that puts together many of the modules and source code we talked about on this blog during the past months. In particular,  we’ll create a Gadgeteer device that uses touch screen capabilities of Display T35 to provide access […]

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Using voice commands to control a servo

Posted by Marco Minerva I’m very interested in combining .NET Gadgeteer devices with other techonologies. In this post I’ll show how to use the Microsft Speech Platform to recognize speech and send commands to control a servo. Let’s start with the Gadgeteer device. We’ll use the HiTec HS-311 servo, the same that has been described […]

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Creating an UDP Server with .NET Gadgeteer

Posted by Marco Minerva Some time ago, we presented a simple TCP Server for .NET Gadgeteer, that has been used in many other projects. Today, we’ll see how to create another kind of server, based on UDP protocol. Its behavior is similar to the one of our TCP Server, but it is simpler because with UDP we don’t have to take […]

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Wi-Fi Gadgeteer Robot controlled by Windows Phone with image streaming

Posted by Marco Minerva I have updagred the .NET Gadgeteer Robot I described in the post Constructing a Bluetooth controlled Robot, replacing the Bluetooth Module with Wi-Fi and adding a camera to stream images. The result is a Robot that can be controlled by a Windows Phone application, with which it is also possible to show […]

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Controlling a Light Switch using Windows Phone

Posted by Marco Minerva In this post, I’ll show how to control a Relay module using a Windows Phone app that is able to remotely turn on or off a light. Let’s start creating a new Gadgeteer application. Connect the following modules to a FEZ Spider Mainboard: USB ClientDP; WiFi RS21, to allow connections to the device; Multicolor […]

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Connessioni XBee con device .NET Gadgeteer (Italiano)

By Mike Dodaro, translated by Marco Minerva from the original English version Le schede XBee hanno un costo estramamente contenuto e possono essere integrate in qualsiasi tipo di device. Il loro raggio di funzionamento supera quello delle connessioni Bluetooth. L’articolo Zigbee Networking with XBee Series 2 and Seeed’s Products fornisce una rapida introduzione alle funzionalità di XBee. Il libro di Robert Faludi intitolato Building Wireless […]

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.NET Gadgeteer event in Pisa, Italy

Yesterday, in Pisa, Italy, an event organized by the Tuscany .NET Community took place. We have continued the work on the robot we talked about during our first .NET Gadgeteer meeting, on May 12th. Our goals were the following: to update Rover in order to control it via Wi-Fi (the original version was based on […]

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Utilizzare Mayhem con .NET Gadgeteer (Italiano)

By Mike Dodaro, translated by Marco Minerva from the original English version Mayhem è un’applicazione open source che supporta trigger, eventi e azioni. Il cuore del sistema Mayhem è in esecuzione su un PC, ma gli eventi e le azioni che utilizza possono essere usati praticamente con ogni piattaforma e device. Gli sviluppatori di Mayhem dicono che anche chi non è […]

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Making Mayhem with .NET Gadgeteer

Mayhem is an open source application that supports triggers, events, and reactions.  The core Mayhem application runs on a PC, but the events and reactions it uses are interoperable with just about any platform or device.  The guys making Mayhem say that non-programmers can use it to automate anything!  This seems an invitation to try Mayhem with .NET Gadgeteer. Here’s a screen shot […]

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XBee Control of .NET Gadgeteer Robot

The code in this brief example is part of an investigation into bandwidth and latency of XBee radios used for remote control.  I’d be interested in any other experiments with XBees.  If you have something, we can discuss a guest post.  There are several versions of this robot now.  The original by Eduardo Velloso uses light sensors and can be controlled […]

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me-bot: Gadgeteer Avatar Robot

me-bot: Gadgeteer Avatar Robot Guest post by Paul C Mineau. I was inspired by a TED talk given by Cynthia Breazeal filmed in December 2010 entitled The Rise of Personal Robots. She describes the ‘me-bot’ at about 5 minutes in, and later describes the ‘Grandma-bot’.  I’m working on building a me-bot using Gadgeteer, and this […]

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Using XBee Radios with .NET Gadgeteer and the XBeeClient Libraries

Using the .NET Gadgeteer platform with XBee radios got a lot easier with the alpha release of XBeeClient libraries written by Paul Mineau.  XBee radios use low-bandwidth serial protocol that is useful in many applications.  This example implements an XBee network using three XBee radios that support a surveillance device.  The .NET Gadgeteer modules include a Gyro module and Relay module from Seeed Studio, and a Camera […]

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Autonomous Builders, Makers, and Shakers

More than 100,000 people, a San Francisco Bay area contingent of what is called the maker movement, gathered in San Mateo over the weekend of May 19-20 at Maker Faire. This franchised gathering with copies in other cities is billed as “A two-day, family-friendly festival of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the maker movement“.  It used to be called do-it-yourself (DIY), […]

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Constructing a Bluetooth controlled Robot

Posted by Marco Minerva In this post, I’ll show how to construct a robot with .NET Gadgeteer and how to control it using a Bluetooth connection from a PC application based on the 32feet.NET library. Let’s start from .NET Gadgeteer part. The base of our robot is the Rover 5 Tank Chassis, that provides two […]

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.NET Gadgeteer Bluetooth to Control Relay Circuits

Here is a simple adaptation of Marco Minerva’s previous example: Controlling a Gadgeteer device using Bluetooth Module and 32feet.NET library.  This application uses the GHI Electronics Bluetooth Module to control the relays on a Seeed Relay Module.  You can use this scenario to turn on lights, start a motor, or start or stop any electrical […]

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XBee Radios in .NET Gadgeteer Devices

XBee radios are inexpensive and they can be embedded in all kinds of devices.  XBees can be networked so that a failure of one radio does not impar communication between and among others in the network.  Their range exceeds that of Bluetooth connections.  The article Zigbee Networking with XBee Series 2 and Seeed’s Products provides a quick overview of XBee […]

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Controlling a Gadgeteer device using Bluetooth Module and 32feet.NET library

Posted by Marco Minerva In this post, I’ll show how to send messages to a GHI Bluetooth module from a PC application using the 32feet .NET library. First of all, let’s create the Gadgeteer application. Connect an USB ClientDP and an OLED Display to a FEZ Spider Mainboard, as in the following screenshot. .NET Gadgeteer […]

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Mind Control of .NET Gadgeteer Device via Neurosky EEG Sensor

This experiment leaves much to the imagination, but it does demonstrate how wave forms of the human brain can determine events on a device with an embedded microcontroller.  This code scenario is submitted for use in the Open Health and Fitness Data Aggregator project headed by Ira Laefsky. The Neurosky Mind Wave sensor is an economical electroencephalograph designed for extensibility with other applications.  For less […]

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.NET Gadgeteer Bluetooth Control of Motor Driver

A previous example .NET Gadgeteer Motor Driver with Two Motors and Potentiometer demonstrated the GHI Electronics Motor Driver L298 module.  This post uses a similar code scenario, but in this case we control the motors from a serial console that sends messages to a GHI Bluetooth module on the device.  This example also demonstrates how to reverse direction of the motors. The Bluetooth […]

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